Detailed Information - Nuclear Power Plants

Detailed Information - Nuclear Power Plants

Detailed information - Nuclear Power Plant

The water/steam circuit for a nuclear power plant is in principle comparable to that of a conventional power plant. However, there are a number of differences.

The steam boiler is replaced by a nuclear steam generator, where the heat from the nuclear reaction is transferred to the steam generator via the coolant. The permissible steam pressures and temperatures are significantly lower than in a conventional power plant. In order to generate the same power output under these steam conditions, the amount of steam produced is many times higher as is the amount of condensate provided to the deaerator.

The relatively low steam pressure and temperature level of the nuclear power plant also has additional consequences for the design of the internals of the deaerator. Water is formed much quicker in the steam during its expansion in the steam turbine. Since only a limited quantity of moisture is permissible in the steam turbine, the water is separated from the steam after certain expansion stages and the steam is reheated. The drain steam for the deaerator is generally wet steam containing a quantity of moisture.
Furthermore, the quantity of drain steam is larger than in a conventional power plant.